Thursday, April 25, 2013

Snug a Bud in a Rug


Taken April 13, 2013.

Click image to see larger version

26 comments:

  1. After the coldest spring here in decades I don't care how hot and humid it is when I get to DC but thanks for the tip about the freezing AC in the Malice convention hotel, Maria. However, I am gobsmacked at the idea of GRAVY on chips and cheese! I know some people here swear by gravy on chips but I'm not one of them! (I have tried grits though, once when we were in Georgia, I think!)

    I'm getting seriously excited about our trip

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  2. Morning all.

    Howdy Whit. Sorry you weren't feeling well but sure am glad to have you back here (though not so glad to think about the arrival of heat and humidity.

    I think, Larry, that it was just the limitation of my camera's focus range/speed. I guess that's another nice thing about e-books for writers -- you can keep messing with them. Of course, that's sort of a downside too since you can never say they're done.

    Good luck with the pollen and family, Maria ... maybe there's not much difference since both are necessary and needed but definitely irritating.

    I'm with you, Dina, on preferring heat over cold. I hate hot weather.

    Seeing spring start up, Candis, is so beautiful. Hope you catch up with us soon.

    Hi Nicky. I've been to Montreal several times and was told by the natives that I must try the poutine. I think it's an acquired taste as I found decidedly less than wonderful.

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  3. Morning Andi and Nicky,

    Nicky before I lived in Germany I would have never thought of having mayo put on my fries. But with the German mayo I tried it once and after that I was hooked. I grew up with grits and it's just something that's a b'fast food. However, there are some foods down here I won't even try - chitlins comes to mind. :)

    Andi last night we actually got down to almost 40F. After the rain yesterday we're supposed to be in the high 70's for a little while. I'm beginning to think this is our last time and then the heat.

    Whit

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  4. I'll have a giant basket of poutine with some grits on the side please and thankya. :)

    Good day to you all!

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    1. Hi Jen,

      I hope you're doing well. The last time I was here I didn't get a chance to thank you for all the kind things you had said and I really do appreciate it.

      Oddly enough, I've had grits every morning this week with the exception of today. Put plenty of butter, salt and pepper and you're good to go. But if you have someone that knows how to make red eye gravy then a trip to heaven has to be put off until you eaten that. :)

      Whit

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  5. I like to try it all when I'm abroad and definitely loved mayonnaise on chips which we first encountered in Holland when the kids were small. But I usually leave the more unusual dishes to my husband who has been practically everywhere in the world, so while he tried wichetty grubs and crocodile in Australia, I stuck to kangaroo! (Mind you, he loves that old British staple, black pudding, which is never going to be on my menu!) I'm looking forward to trying all kinds of new things in the very near future!

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    1. While living in Europe I tried a lot of things I never thought I would. Snails for one and I loved them. I never could get used to the blood sausages and so on though. Traveling around the U.S., I've found just as many odd dishes (to me) that I did overseas. Where I live now is mostly where I grew up. The thing around is is Bar-B-Que. But I can go 20 miles away and the Bar-B-Que is different and the sauce is vastly different. Of course no one makes a better Bar-B-Que sauce than right here. :)

      Whit

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  6. Hi, all. Grits are great - I love them with cheese. And I like to try different things but grubs are a bit too different.

    One nice thing about this area is there is a lot of ethnic food to be had!

    Stay comfortable, everyone.

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  7. I'm all over the poutine - love it! Not so much with the mayo though, it's not a condiment I grew up using so I don't particularly like it.

    Mm, grits. Yes, please.

    As to 'Q - yum, yum! I prefer dry rub barbecue (Texas style) but won't turn my nose up at the other variations. Smoked/grilled meat: FTW!!

    A lovely sunny, if chilly, day here which will morph into an equally lovely weekend with temps in the high 60s/low 70s: utter perfection!

    Happy Thursday, all!

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  8. Morning!

    I think chili cheese fries are the closest we get to poutine here. Mason likes honey mustard on his fries. (kids) A recent development is chips (potato chips, maybe "crisps" in those funny-talkin' furrin places), usually kettle-cooked, covered with cheese and diced tomatos. The cheese can be anything from that goop they put on stadium nachos, to feta. There might be some kind of dressing, usually sour cream-based, as well.

    Andi, closeups tend to have the smallest depth of field. You can compensate by narrowing the aperture (higher f-numbers) but that usually means slowing the shutter.

    Whit, we're still on either side of 70 for highs here. Spring is holding on just a little while longer.

    Maria, hope that the family visit goes smoothly, or at least isn't too horrid.

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    1. Morning Larry,

      I don't know if they still have them, but I remember Frito chili pies. To a teenager back then that was good eating.

      I looked at the weather forecast for here and it's supposed to stay in the 70's also. If only it could stay like that all year round.

      Whit

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  9. Morning Dina and Maria,

    Yep cheese grits are good! I agree about grubs. I have tried stuff that as soon as I tasted I tried to get a napkin to get it out of my mouth. Yuk!

    Maria down here mayo is a staple. I can remember as a kid if dinner wasn't for awhile and I was hungry I'd make a mayo sandwich. That's all it was just some mayo put on bread. Of course now of days I wouldn't think of eating something like that, but back then it wasn't so bad. I lived out in Texas for about 5 years and their Q is pretty good, but they use mainly beef and here we go whole hog. As a matter of fact there are Bar-B-Que clubs all throughout this area. You have to be a member of the club and during the summer 3 families are picked each month to each buy a whole hog. It's Q'ed over a 24 hour period. The next night everyone brings a covered dish. Our local club had a long wooden building. Inside is a long long table. Once everything is set up you start at the beginning and get your plate, utensils, etc. Then at the beginning of the table is two huge pans filled with pulled pork. One has sauce and one is without. You get what you want and start down the table. Every type of covered dish you can imagine is there and at last the desserts. Then at the end another choice. Either iced sweet tea or regular iced tea. You take your plate outside where there are tables and benches and start eating and talking to your neighbors. I haven't been to one in years, but my youngest brother is still a member although he lives an hour and a half away from here. I've probably talked about this before many times and if so sorry to repeat myself so much.

    It sounds like a lovely w/e is ahead - enjoy.

    Whit

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  10. Well clearly my dislike of poutine is a substantial culinary character flaw ... which my mother could have told you if only you'd asked as she's known it since I was a child and refused (and still refuse) to eat either gefilte fish or borscht (but I do love kishke so that mitigates the severity of the flaw somewhat).

    Larry, that's what I meant by the limitations of my camera -- it doesn't have the range of f-stops to handle some extreme shots. That's the tradeoff for using a p&s (which gives me flexibility in getting w/o changing lenses and light weight) over a DSLR.

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  11. WHIT!!!!!! How ya doing!?!!!!

    Can someone explain to me the diff between grits and polenta? :)

    Not poutine but just had Penn Cove Mussels with fries on em which were covered in a tomato and bacon gravy. Non-dairy as there wasn't any cream or cheese and it was out of this world good. My husband was skeptical at first but then he frikken licked the bowl at the end. :)

    Long week at work. Still not eating past 7pm. I'm waking up fresh but hungry so eating big in the a.m. and at lunch.

    Now I'm want BBQ.

    'Hawks up 3-1 in the 3rd round. Game here Friday. I want to see them shake hands this game. (Meaning we win game 5 here at home) :)



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  12. HEY JANET!!!!

    I'm doing well at the present and I hope you are too.

    From my understanding grits and polenta are about the same except for the grind of the meal. I think that is what I heard before. Anyway I've always found it kind of funny how some people will strike down grits and come back and say what a lovely meal they had and the polenta was excellent. Go figure. :)

    I've been doing the not eating after 8pm for a long time, but in my case it from my stomach and GERD. Nothing worse than waking up in the middle of the night and thinking you're having a heart attack and it only acid reflux. Ugg!

    Good luck with the Hawks and Friday.

    Take care

    Whit

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  13. Another beauty Andi. I love how they are wrapped in the fresh new green. :-)

    And it doesn't surprise me that you wouldn't be keen for poutine.

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  14. BBQ FRITO CHILI PIE W/MAYO OMG.

    Whit, as the sweet old ladies of my youth used to say: you're a peach, darlin.

    Can someone explain to me the diff between grits and polenta?

    Janet, Whit beat me to it and of course he was more polite about it -- my explanation involved the phrase "pretentious assholes". ;)

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  15. And it doesn't surprise me that you wouldn't be keen for poutine.

    Come on Candis, aren't you talking about the national dish of Canada! How could anyone not love it. :D

    One thing Andi said she wouldn't eat that I've always thought I would like to try is borsch. Have no idea how it would taste, but I've always heard so much about it.

    Hope you're having a good day.

    Whit

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  16. I was served borscht at a posh dinner once, Whit and couldn't refuse. Forced it down but I hate beetroot so I don't recommend it!
    I'm always amused at the language differences between us, the old 'two nations divided by a common tongue' thing. I'm sure you all know that we eat faggots over here and that it doesn't mean we're bigoted cannibals, while I'm always tickled when someone refers to being pissed. (Er, that's drunk over here.) Loads and loads of other potential pitfalls and I just love them, it's so interesting the way language develops and digresses!

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  17. Nicky it's just not from the two nations divided that language has taken a detour. People from other parts of the states find my language and accent sometimes hard to understand. I can drive about 8 hours from here and I'm in Cajun country. Language, food and customs are completely different from where I live. I've always wondered if the states had the same thousands of years of history as Europe would we have split up as smaller nations because of words and accents. One thing I noticed about myself is when I lived around the U.S. and in Germany my accent actually changed a good bit. When I lived in New Hampshire I actually had a girl ask me once if I was from Boston. I laughed and asked her how many people from Boston do you know that says y'all. Y'all is a typically Southeast American word. Even without the accent as soon as it's spoken people know where you're from. :)

    Whit

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  18. Andi -- I'm hoping spring decides to stick around here too. We're getting flurries tonight. :-(

    Whit -- I thought the butter tart was Canada's National dish, ha. ;-) Do you have butter tarts there?

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  19. Hi Candis,

    You're getting flurries - How lucky can someone get! We had absolutely no snow down here this year.

    I don't think we have butter tarts here, unless they are called by some other name. But then again, I remember awhile back when I told you about how much I used to loved my grandmother's coconut cakes. I think you said you'd never seen one. I haven't seen one in a long time now. They're usually made during Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays down here. Since I think a lot is involved in getting one made I don't think too many people make them anymore. Another X-mas favorite was ambrosia. It's orange slices (with all the skin, even around the pulp taken off), citrus and coconut in the juice of all and I don't know what else is added. For some reason my grandmother used to always serve this in cut crystal stemmed wide glasses. She wouldn't serve it any other way. As far as I was concerned she could have just given me a big bowl of it and would have been very happy. :)

    Whit

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    1. Yep, I remember the coconut cake. :D

      Ambrosia -- I've been watching True Blood, and the grandmother served Ambrosia I think. I didn't know what it was, ha! Sounds like an apt name. :-)

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  20. Hey Whit, is this the coconut cake you remember. I think my Southern Indiana grandmother made this.
    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/coconut-cake-with-7-minute-frosting-recipe/index.html

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    1. Hi Jim,

      Yep that's the one! I was thinking about this after I wrote about it and I know where I think I can get one. We have a Mennonite bakery here. They make excellent pastries and cakes. I think I might ask if they make coconut cakes. Of course like my grandmother who always used real coconuts and none of the pre-packaged stuff, I'll ask if they do that.

      Thanks

      Whit

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    2. Oh ... that looks so good. I love coconut.

      I hope you're lucky in tracking it down Whit ... or, you could try your hand at baking. :D

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