Monday, April 12, 2010

Still Life with Dogs


Taken March 30, 2010

Taken April 8, 2010.
Click images to see larger versions

18 comments:

  1. Oh look, I left a comment on the last post just in time for you to put up a new one.

    The only "still life" I get from my dogs is them sprawled on the floor.

    It's good to see Spring has come to your woods.

    I found a Science-y po-em o' mine.

    Event Horizon


    It was never a question
    really, falling in love with you
    As inevitable -- unavoidable
    as gravity

    Even celestial
    we felt its pull
    and fell to earth

    Inside the arc of your arms
    - the Swartzchild radius -
    distance collapses
    time flows eternal
    Creator - Preserver -
    Destroyer

    The Three-fold
    Goddess laughs as
    she claps and
    claps her
    one hand

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  2. Evening, Lori. I like that poem, especially the final image.

    P.S. posts are pre-scheduled and go up every morning at 5:00 a.m. Eastern time.

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  3. Ah, now I'll have to figure out what time that is here.

    I'm still adjusting to the end of daylight savings time - but then I'm still adjusting to a lot of things (and Lily is still whining for her dinner at a 4:15 even though I've been fairly consistent at feeding her at the "new" [5:15] time).

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  4. Andi, Love Giddy and the Daffs put it on my background for the week.
    These days need plenty of zen.

    Daughter got off with a mid-size ice chest of food and her mountain of clean clothes.

    Lori, Love the poem. Science runs in my blood. You are BUSY with remodeling. A real Jane of all trades.


    Maria, hope the words all flow and the back is better.
    Beth, hope Keeper is more settled.

    Jim, Tally Ho.

    Marvelous Monday to All.

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  5. It's GMT-5 here (or 5:59 a.m. as I write this), Lori.

    Morning Lisa. Glad I had something soothing to start your week.

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  6. I love that pic too - interesting perspective.

    Waving to Lori - love the poem! And the life you lead sounds so interesting. No normal here, either!

    Glad you had a good visit with your daughter, Lisa, and I'm sure she appreciates the goodies and Mom attention.

    Keeper has his good moments and bad. His life won't get much more normal any time soon. His dad's talking about giving him away - poor dog.

    Mulching flowerbeds today - working on "curb appeal" of the house. Thanks for the support, everyone. Here's hoping it sells soon.

    Have a great Monday, y'all!

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  7. Yo ho! Called out of work so I can get the doc to look at the gimpy foot. I didn't tell 'em the appt is at 3pm, but I can call into the 10:30 meeting that will take up half the time I'd actually have been at the office anyway.

    Got a bunch done on White Pickups last night, writing easily 2500 words of new material plus transcribing some 1800 words from my notebook (written over lunches a while back). I thought, "looks like 60, maybe 70 eps total" then laughed because I had the same thought at about the same point when writing FAR Future (which ended up at 102 eps, around 90K words). Whatever… it's more progress than I've made in the last couple months. Leftover productivity vibes are on the counter for whoever needs 'em. :-D

    Lori, science poems are The Awesome. So are composting toilets, but Susan Carpenter (a journo for the LA Times) did you one better: she built a composting toilet from components. When I get to that point, I'll probably send the ordure to holding tanks in the basement, because otherwise I'd have to carry the slop buckets all the way through the house to dispose of them — YUCK!

    Lisa, hope you find some zen… and send me any extra, OK? thx

    Beth, hope you enjoy spiffing up the house. Maybe you can get Keeper to do some digging for you!

    Gonna pretend to work now…

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  8. Gorgeous poem, Lori! Good way to start my morning.

    After a sleepless night, called in to work so I can get some stuff done today. The pollen is winning here - ridiculously high counts and I'm feeling every bit of it.

    Still a bit panicky about the short story. eep!

    What I wouldn't do for a week off! (Yet, there's this small matter of $$)

    Happy Monday!!

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  9. The picture was serendipity, Beth. I was using a fallen log to frame the daffs when Giddy decided to walk into my picture. After I looked at teh results, I decided I like the one with her in it better than the ones without her. I'm sorry about Keeper; I hope things work out. Maybe if you keep Keeper in the front yard that will give your house even more curb appeal.

    Good luck at the doc with your foot, Farf. Con call meetings are the best -- no one can tell how bored you are.

    If your spring is exploding like ours, Maria, I'm not all surprised at the massive pollen invasion.

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  10. Halloo all.

    Still waiting here, though now I'm waiting for a later step in the process.

    Lori, has that been published anywhere? If not, you might try sending it to Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine. It looks like the sort of thing I've seen them buy. If you're interested I can probably dig up the current submission info.

    TTFN

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  11. Lots of errands today and I am exhausted. But the car is ready to drive to Malice!

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  12. Kelly, that quite a compliment. No, I haven't had any poems published. I'd want to brush them up a bit before I tried submitting any. I'm a mess at deciding line breaks and such. And it seems like I'm constantly changing them.

    Lisa, our house was built in the 50's, somewhere up in the Tasmanian highlands to house laborers during one of Tasmania's massive hydro-electric dam building periods. Many of these laborers were refugees from Eastern Europe and had few skills other than a willingness to live in the middle of nowhere. These "Hydro Houses" were sold after those little towns dwindled and died as the projects were completed. Ours was cut in three parts, transported, and finally perched on this property in 1975. Because these houses were built in areas of hardwood forests all the timbers are hardwood, most so dense you have to drill a pilot hole before you can pound in a nail. What they didn't have was "finishing" materials, so the walls are a hodgepodge of coverings, etc. Basically, we're striping it back to the frame and redoing the surfaces. Plus refitting the bathroom and kitchen. I've already redone much of the electrical and copper plumbing. The "plumbing" (actually pvc) I'm working on at the moment is for our rain water collection system (we don't have town water out here). It keeps us busy.

    FARf, I wanted to build one, but Imogen wouldn't let me. She says that I have too many unfinished projects as it is. Sheesh!

    Beth, not-normal is the new black.

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  13. Nothing better than sitting by yourself on a dock. Of course it's better with a fishing rod. But you gotta have opposable thumbs for that.

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  14. Especially love the dogs on the dock photo. Exquisite.

    Maria & I get to be on a panel at a convention together! Kicks up happy heels!

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  15. Howdy Kelly. Next up, waiting for Godot?

    Ooh going to Malice -- that will be exciting. And will you give Nancy and Maria a big proxy hug from me?

    You know, Lori, just reading that list of things makes me want to take a nice nap.

    Mary, the dogs say you underestimate the value of a good set of canines. ;)

    That sounds like a lot of fun, Nancy. So is the panel discussion "Hill country and plains, lands of opportunity ... for mayhem"?

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  16. haha! "Lands of opportunity. . .for mayhem." I like that. And it's so true. From sea to shining bloody sea.

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  17. So now we know why highways on maps are red.

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  18. ha! I'll never look at maps the same way again.

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