Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Under the Spreading Chestnut Oak Tree

In the forest, trees grow up, not out, putting their energy into the reaching for light. So trees like this one, much older than everything else around them, are survivors -- left for shade or wind breaks or property line markers -- of the clearcutting done by homesteaders who tried to farm here. By the early 20th century, most of the farms had been abandoned and the state found itself with a lot of land that was lousy for farming but great for growing trees.


Taken May 10, 2009.


Happily, the state saw the wisdom of returning the land to what it once was. Now Brown County has the largest state park, a state forest, a national forest, and thousands and thousands of privately held forested acres.

18 comments:

  1. The forests are our only renewable legacy.
    As long as we don`t convert the land to industry or parking lots, you`ll always have a shooting studio for the wonderful shots.
    Oh Andi,
    Good day

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  2. Morning Head. What saves the forest around here is clay soil lying over rock and very hill terrain -- yay for the unfarmable and undevelopable.

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  3. Morning Andi and Head.
    Yeah Trees.
    Waves as off to mimes.
    (Just wish those kids would be mimes today.)

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  4. Morning, all. Trees - one thing I shall miss greatly when our office moves to soul-sucking concrete'n'steel land. Sadly, could not be helped.

    Saw Star Trek movie last night. Totally FTW. Had all the fun and horrific cliches of the original but oooh, much shinier. For the record, I am a huge fan of the original series, warts and all.

    Mimes are somewhat better. Still a bit shaky, but less frantic. Let's hope it stays that way.

    And today, there is SUN!

    Happy Wednesday, gang!

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  5. Glad things are better, Maria. But I agree on the lack of trees - one of the main reasons I don't live in big cities.

    Count the days til your students aren't students for a few months, Lisa, and you become a writer instead of a teacher. But aren't teachers always teachers, even when they're not teaching?

    Hard to imagine your forest as a farm, andi - it's so - foresty. :-)

    Left the windows open all day yesterday - what a treat. Hopefully the heat doesn't return any time soon.

    Happy Hump Day, y'all!

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  6. Morning Lisa -- happy one less day in those mimes to you.

    Hi Maria -- glad you've some sun to enhance your enjoyment of those trees while you've got them.

    Beth, that was the problem (or good thing from my point of view) -- most people could only imagine turning these forests as farms; they couldn't actually do it.

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  7. They make such a lovely canopy. It's great when the old trees can be preserved. I'm glad your state has seen the wisdom of The Plan and is allowing trees to dominate again.

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  8. Hello all. Love the trees. Nothing like them. I love in a very green part of suburbia which is great. I can't imagine living without green outside my window.

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  9. I'm moving kinda slow today but don't want to forget to at least wave.

    Andi, Thank you for these lovely photos.

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  10. Yay for good state management. :)

    Hope you're having a lovely walk in your woods this morning.

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  11. Good morning all. I will be a spotty correspondent for a bit between overflow from the physics dept. and travel schedule. Hope y'all have a great next two weeks.

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  12. I don't know how long it's going to take, but I am committed to getting there eventually to see your magical forest first hand. Maybe this autumn will be long and low key enough.

    Heh, Kelly, the jokes about the 2nd law of thermodynamics would write themselves if it weren't for all that entropy crap. Be safe and have fun!

    Hope the rest of you are well as can be and having a good day even if you're trapped by the mimes.

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  13. Hi Coneflower, I don't think it was so much wisdom as desperation -- at the time this was the poorest county in the state; no one was going to buy all that land. And then the Depression came along making it even worse. But that turned out to be the real key -- the CCC did a huge amount of the tree re-planting and the state park is full of gorgeous buildings and walls built by the CCC using the local stone. (And this was probably way more than you wanted to know.)

    Hi Dina. I agree -- I cannot imagine living without trees. I love going to the desert southwest to hike but after a week or two, I need to come home to the woods.

    Hi kb. Hope you find some speed or else find a lack of need for it.

    Hi O. See comment to Coneflower above. :)

    Kelly, forget Jen's thermodynamics joke -- I was just reading in Science News that they're finding that nanomachines may violate it.

    Jen, any time you want to come, the woods (and I and Jim and The Pack) will be here eagerly waiting.

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  14. There's nothing like big ol trees.

    Where I vacation up in Northern Minnesota is a National Park. A lot of people think it's old growth pines but it isn't, it was all logged in the 1800's and then it all grew back because it's not good for farming and it's in the middle of nowhere so not that many people have moved there to live. But you will often see one lonely tree that towers above the others - that is an old growth tree. And it's usually a bit mishapen. The loggers would leave one tree standing but cut off the branches in a way that it "pointed" in the direction the loggers had moved on to (or maybe it pointed back toward civilization, I don't remember, but it pointed and the pointing was understood). It's fun to try to spot those trees amidst the thousands of other trees.

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  15. Thank you for sharing your green oasis with us, Andif.

    I never liked living in Ohio until spending a month out West. The desert is beautiful, but after a month I was so glad to get home to the green of Ohio.

    And today, I am so glad this week is half over. Wishing you all a great end to the week.

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  16. That's a neat bit of trivia, Mary. Makes me want to go up there and look for trees.

    Hi bono. Hope the rest of your weeks whizzes by.

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  17. Good evening all.

    It's good to hear that somewhere things have actually been allowed to reverse themselves to a natural state. Hooray for the trees!

    It was a beautiful day here today but rain looms once again after a full week of it.

    The Mazda has yet to be loaded in Vegas.

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  18. Hi b2. I guess that car knows that anticipation makes the heart grow fonder.

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